Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10739/2402
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dc.contributor.authorChatterjee, Arup K.-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-30T13:05:26Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-30T13:05:26Z-
dc.date.issued2019-03-23-
dc.identifier.citationChatterjee, A. (2019, March 23). Lamb, Peacock and Mill. The Hindu.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/lamb-peacock-and-mill/article26624112.ece-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10739/2402-
dc.description.abstractHow a bunch of career clerks sitting in Company headquarters in London, who never visited India, managed to create an empire in writing. “I had grown to my desk,” wrote a retiree in Romantic England as he turned 50, “and the wood had entered into my soul.” The author of Essays of Elia, and Tales from Shakespeare (written with his sister Mary), Charles Lamb was much more than someone whose wistful yet practical essays helped augment sales of London Magazine, or one befriended by the great wordsmiths of the age, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Percy Bysshe Shelley, William Hazlitt and William Wordsworth.en_US
dc.formatformat-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Hinduen_US
dc.source.uriURI-
dc.subjectEast India Companyen_US
dc.subjectLamben_US
dc.titleLamb, peacock and mill: How a bunch of career clerks sitting in Company headquarters in London, who never visited India, managed to create an empire in writingen_US
dc.typeNewspaper Articleen_US
dc.institutionJindal Global Law Schoolen_US
Appears in Collections:JGU Publications: Popular Articles, Literary items, Opinions, Reviews etc.

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