Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10739/2303
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dc.contributor.authorRaman, Rashmi-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-10T12:38:31Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-10T12:38:31Z-
dc.date.issued2019-01-30-
dc.identifier.citationRaman, Rashmi. (January 30, 2019). Three Fallacies of International Criminal Justice – Part Three. IntLawGrrls.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://ilg2.org/2019/01/30/three-fallacies-of-international-criminal-justice-part-three/-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10739/2303-
dc.descriptionMy final premise is based on looking at the retributive mechanisms that have been the hallmark of the completed trials at the permanent court and also at the ad hoc tribunals. During the years leading up to the Rome Statute, there was debate and discussion on the model to be followed at the ICC.en_US
dc.formatformat-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIntLawGrrlsen_US
dc.source.uriURI-
dc.subjectInternational Criminalen_US
dc.titleThree fallacies of international criminal justice – part threeen_US
dc.typepopular articleen_US
dc.institutionJindal Global Law Schoolen_US
Appears in Collections:JGU Publications: Popular Articles, Literary items, Opinions, Reviews etc.

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